Proposed towers get static on both sides of the border

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Re: Proposed towers get static on both sides of the border

Postby jon » Sun Aug 25, 2013 5:55 pm

dial twister wrote:I guess there is nothing the CRTC can really do about a border blaster on AM.

Borrowing a page from Canadian broadcast history, there is one approach that has proven itself in the past. Izzy Asper started his broadcast career by bluffing one of the smartest station owners of all time, Gordon McLendon, into believing that he would use this approach. The end result was that Izzy bought Gordon's border blaster TV station for bargain basement prices.

The approach: license a station in the target market on the adjacent frequency. Effectively drowning out the border blaster.

Although not the intention, CKAV was licensed on 106.3 in Vancouver, despite 7000 letters of protest from Canadian listeners of KWPZ-FM in Lynden on 106.5.

There was not quite as big a fuss when CHAN-TV-8 was licensed, but there was certainly a lot of complaints. Not so much from Vancouver viewers of JP Patches on KIRO-TV-7, since most CBS programming was available on KVOS-TV-12. But from the very vocal Vancouver viewers of educational television on KCTS-TV-9, which was a fairly low-powered station in those days. Off air reception was the norm at the end of the 1950s, in the days we are talking about. With cable TV only available in a few areas.

On AM, the only example that readily comes to mind was the licensing of CJJC on 800 (from 850, in the early 1970s). No consideration was given to KGMI-790 in Bellingham, which would have rated protection for listeners just 20 miles North, had the national border not been in the way. KQIN-800 in Burien, a suburb of Seattle, was only licensed to 500 watts daytime-only around the same time, in part, to protect KGMI.
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Re: Proposed towers get static on both sides of the border

Postby xwdcatvb » Sun Aug 25, 2013 7:11 pm

Eldon-Mr.CFAY wrote:Greetings,
You bring up a good point Dial Twister and I agree with you. CJRJ 1200 is trying their best to serve the South Asian Market and in my opinion doing a good job. I have even heard an afternoon weekday talk show in English discussing issues. They have had some challenges though in recent months and I hope they can succeed. It is one of Vancouver's very few independently owned AMs and the lady who started it seems to be truly dedicated to broadcasting to the South Asian Market. With all the extra competition and possibly a new FM on 107.7 that might cater to Surrey and Greater Vancouver South Asian market it seems to be getting even worse for this market. From what I have seen of applications for the new 107.7 at least 8 or 10 of them are from South ASian companies for the upcoming CRTC Hearing. I wish CJRJ all the best in their broadcasting on 1200 AM and again hope they can meet the challenges of additional competition etc..

73s, All the Best,

Eldon


Well, "the lady who started it"/Rim Jhim is Shushma Datt, whose career dates to the Beeb in London and includes the very early days of CJVB/1470.

But RJ loses Newton/South Surrey at night, does it not? The licence was renewed on a short leash earlier this year:

<http://www.crtc.gc.ca/eng/archive/2013/2013-164.htm>

The Commish noted the competition from the Excited States but seemed harsh on Canadian Talent Development.
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Re: Proposed towers get static on both sides of the border

Postby Eldon-Mr.CFAY » Thu Aug 07, 2014 4:10 am

Greetings Everyone,
Just an update on this topic. Well the August CRTC decisions for new licenses for Greater Vancouver were released Wed. August 6, 2014. South Fraser Broadcasting was given the license for 107.7 FM and its owned by a South Asian gentleman. How does this link up with KRPI 1550. His father owns Sher-E-Punjab Broadcasting which owns KRPI 1550 Point Roberts (formerly Ferndale). Quite a bit of controversy about South Fraser been granted the license for Surrey too because the owner who is directly related to out of country station KRPI owner and he managed that station for several years. He also owns the property on Imhoff Road in Ferndale and has been receiving rent etc. regularly from Sher-E-Punjab and his relatives there. All this has been pointed out in opposition to the granting of a license to South Fraser Broadcasting by CJRJ 1200 licensee and one dissenting CRTC member who disagreed with the granting of the licence to them. Regarding Sher-E-Punjab no license was granted to them for a Canadian station on 600 AM khz. in Vancouver or either of the other two applicants one of which was a business news format. The CRTC stated they wanted to review out of country radio stations targetting a Canadian market without been licensed in Canada as one of the reasons given in the recent decision. So it appears the CRTC will hold another hearing in the near future to license someone on 600 khz. in Vancouver. Regarding KRPI 1550 and Sher-E-Punjab , they state if they are licensed in Canada for 600 khz. AM in Vancouver they will give up 1550 AM in Washington State (Point Roberts). After going to all the trouble to move from Ferndale to Point Roberts I would think they wouldn't just give it up but sell the station IF they are granted 600 khz. or some other AM frequency in Vancouver, BC.. in the near future. They do claim they will do this. I still am wondering how these South Asian companies can get away with owning stations in two separate companies regarding American or Canadian citizenship requirements??? It seems they are playing leapfrog jumping from one country to another.

Most radio licensees in the United States or Canada cannot do that including large radio corporations like Corus/Shaw and Rogers , or Clear Channel and Cumulus in the USA... I find it strange that Sher-E-Punjab and that one in Oak Harbor Satnam Media seem to be able to pull the regulation loopholes so well.

Regarding previous ownership of KRPI 1550 as KNTR 1550 I have been in touch with the Ellisons in Arizona since my last posting and as I suspected they are indeed very dissappointed in the outcome of 1550 Ferndale, Washington. They bought the station in 1971 as KOQT as a 1000 Watt Daytime Only Station with Hillcrest Chapel/Help Ministries. Both Richard and Leona Ellison were pastors and dedicated to Local Christian radio programming for Whatcom County. They broadcast local Help For Life Talk shows twice a day, Southern Gospel Music, a few syndicated christian programs but mostly local programming. They operated KOQT changing calls to KNTR and boosting power to fulltime operation with 10,000 Watts and 1000 Watts then 50,000 Watts and 10,000 watts night and they built new studios in Ferndale, Washington. They put a tremendous amount of heart and soul into the station and with fundraising and commercials were able to improve the facilities of a little daytime only station in a mobile home to a larger facility. Helped many people out during power outages, with groceries etc. and of course prayer needs. They had local news and weather as well as community builletin board events too. Richard and Leona Ellison recently celebrated their 70th Wedding Anniversary in Arizona. Their daughter Judy who helped operate the station too died in June 2013 at a fairly young age (early 60s) but their other daughter Glenda who was manager of KNTR for quite a few years is very active and lives in Arizona too. The Ellisons were from Washington State and took quite a bit of pride in Bellingham as Glenda was born there. as were other family members .... They operated KNTR/KOQT from 1971 to 1998 just under 30 years and then sold it to another Christian company when they retired and moved to Arizona. The company they sold it to in 1998 changed calls to KCCF (standing for Classics of the Christian Faith) but in the mid-2000s (2004 or so) sold it to the South Asian company who began directing all programming to Vancouver's South Asian community. When the Ellisons sold the station they were promised by the company they sold it to that it would remain a local christian station. Well it did for a few years with mainly christian MOR music, more traditional stuff, they dumped any contemporary or southern gospel music from their playlist. However they did not keep the station and sold it , so as Glenda put it to me recently: THat was a big dissappointment to us that they did not keep their promise! By the way the chief engineer of KNTR for quite a few years was Ron Cowell, he did not verify my reception of KNTR but Judy's husband James Overreign did. At one point the Ellisons and their Help Ministries bought 680 in Lacey , Washington (which was a 250 watt Daytimer) and 1480 KNTB in Lakewood, Washington providing local Christian programming there but later sold those stations because of more limited coverage in those areas. They also helped start several local christian radio stations in Romania as well.

I mentioned about KRPI Sher-E-Punjab interested in starting a station on 600 khz. in Vancouver and sent them the CRTC decision. They were quite interested in that as well as the property in Ferndale possibly been sold and 1550 been given up if KRPI comes to Canada on 600 khz. AM. Glenda was saying her Dad (even though he has been retired for some years) misses radio a lot and really loved radio broadcasting. They are thinking of doing something once again but it would probably be Glenda and her husband who would do the most towards it.

So it will be interesting to see what will happen with KRPI and Sher-E-Punjab's plans for 600 AM and who the CRTC intends to license in Vancouver for 600 AM khz... in the near future. I have not heard anything further about the interference complaints in South Delta and Point Roberts on the KRPI move there so not sure if they have actually started building the transmitter plant in Point Roberts, Washington for KRPI or what.

It will be very interesting to see what happens at the next CRTC Hearing for 600 AM in Vancouver...

Take care everyone, 73s Eldon
Bye . . Mr. CFAY "Frequently On The Frequency"
The CFAY Website: http://cfayradio.wordpress.com
CFAY Radio: http://tinyurl.com/l9qqmh
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Re: Proposed towers get static on both sides of the border

Postby StevenSmith » Sun May 29, 2016 7:21 pm

Hi,

I stumbled on this topic. I was interested in the historical discussions of KOQT and KENY vs. anything to do with more recent tower discussions in Point Roberts. Having been raised in Bellingham, and having at one time run and owned the station that started life as KENY, I thought some of you might enjoy my recollections. I may not have exact dates, but they are fairly close.

In 1966, I got hooked on KPUG in Bellingham. I was 14 years of age and all that great sixties rock music was out there. I built my own bedroom mini radio station, broadcasting a few blocks in my neighborhood. One Saturday in summer of 66 a friend and I walked out Sunset Drive and met KPUG jocks Gary Shannon (19 years old at the time) and Kirk Wilde (about 24 years) who was counting down that week’s top 50. I tell you this, prior to discussing the country stations, so you know I was a normal kid and country was not my first love.

A friend of mine's mom, my friend was a radio enthusiast too, worked at the Coconut Grove bar and she knew the 1550 Country QT staff. So she took my friend and me out to visit a jock. I forget his last name, but the guy on the air was Hal. I bet he is the bumpkin referenced above. He had quite the twang and lacked sophistication. After he went off shift, Jim Lewis came on and he was not a hillbilly....he went on to KPUG and other stations working in news. KOQT was in a trailer on Sterling Drive in north Bellingham. The owner of the station was Joe Tyrrell (sp?) And he was quite the wheeler and dealer. He owned a bar of his own, down by the Grand Theater, called The Golden West. He cross promoted his bar and his radio station. I think he had his own country band as well. He operated on a shoe string and trade outs. Jocks, if they were paid, might get trade outs as compensation. I have friends who worked there back then, my friend Bill remembers a guy from the local electronics shop walking in one day with wire cutters, when Bill was on the air, and snipping the mic cable and taking the studio mic. He said that Joe had never paid for it. That was near the end of the biz reign and, per others I know, the station was off the air for about two years. I estimate the bankruptcy was in late 1966 to 67.

KOQT came back on the air in late 69 or 70. I know when it came back because I was a senior in high school and that was my first paying radio job. In June 1970, I did my first supervised shift and that night I attended graduation exercises at Bellingham High. As someone referenced above, when the station returned to the living it had a downtown biz office by the YMCA. That was staffed by Chet Mathieson (sp?), general manager and sales manager, and a secretary. The broadcasts still came from the trailer in north Bellingham. The station format was easy listening with a bit of rock....we played Let it Be and the Long and Winding Road, Hitching a Ride, Love Grows Where My Rosemary Goes, along with Tony Bennett, Dean Martin, Herb Alpert. But it was not country. The owner was Bob Waters, who had an electronics store in Seattle. His brother was Bellingham lawyer Jim Waters. And the company was Bellingham Broadcasting. The station, when I first saw it, had a minimal production room. In fact, management was interested in me, in part, because they saw a photo of my bedroom radio station and wanted to know if I would move it to their studio. The best programmer they ever brought in, to try to shore it all up, was Les Cole. He had worked at KOMO, Sea-Tac market, and is the guy who hired me as a new recruit. Les hired me but told management to forget about trying to get my homemade board. He quit, in just a few months, in frustration with station ownership/management and lack of budget to do anything. Chet Matheson left too and Waters brought in Larry Shaw who was a jock at KBFW across town. With Shaw, they switched to a beautiful music format, that fizzled, and that is when the Ellison family and Hillcrest Chapel got involved. Waters wanted out and gave it away if they would take it along with the responsibilities. At first, Hillcrest brought in Wayne Kagey, again from KBFW, to manage it. But soon Richard Ellison realized it made more sense to run it himself. He knew what he wanted done. In the early days, Hillcrest tried to work in their gospel music with the beautiful music, going from Sinatra or Jerry Vale to the Gaithers or the Blackwood Brothers....huge contrast in sound that did not integrate into a beautiful music format. I stayed with the station until about 1973 and then went to KBFW. I worked at KOQT, KBFW and KPUG during my college years. The rest of the KOQT story took place after I was gone, but I think the synopsis in posts above is sufficient.

In its early years, daytime KENY, 930am, was a rock station. It was owned and run by Tom Haveman who was a talented announcer. He did much of the air work himself but also had some decent young jocks and the station was pretty popular and it rocked for awhile. At one point, Haveman put in home brew voice tracking, with his own voice as the announcer, and I am told it was amazingly real sounding automation. But, this station, also, struggled financially. My friend Bill, same guy who was at KOQT when the mic was taken, was the engineer. One day the KENY transmitter would not turn on at 6am in the morning. He drove to the transmitter site and vandals had shot out the guy wire insulators. The tower was a bent pile of rubble on the ground. They strung a long wire of sorts to trees or poles and got back on temporarily. The station went country, sometime before 1966, and the two daytimers Country KENY and KOQT competed for awhile. But QT was first to go off the air, but the demise of KENY was not too far behind....maybe a year or so. KENY went off around 1967, as a kid I had a summer or two where I could listen to KJR out of Seattle. KENY, when on the air at 930, snuffed out channel 95 KJR. I think Tom still officially owned it when it went off, but as I recall he might not have been actually managing it and the FCC might have had a problem with unauthorized control....pretty hazy memories there. Back then, if you owned a station, the FCC wanted your company in charge vs. essentially leasing it to another management firm.

KENY came back on as KBFW late 1968 or 69. I could figure it out exactly, if I was inclined to sort through my filing cabinet of docs I inherited when purchasing the station many years later. KBFW was the first station ever bought by Fred Danz, who owned the largest theater chain in the northwest -- SRO. At one point, Sterling Recreation owned or ran all theaters in Bellingham. The station came back on, for a year or so, trying easy listening format with little or no rock. The song I remember best, hearing it over and over again, was Fool on the Hill by Sergio Mendes. The niche in the market was not there, KGMI owned it, so they went country by 1970. KBFW had great ratings for many years, being the only country station. I started there part time as a jock and worked my way to being Fred's G.M. in 1982. Then Fred decided to divest his many stations and I became the managing partner and an owner in 1984. Our company, and I did not realize it at the time, we named Bellingham Broadcasting Corp....same as Bob Water's defunct firm from KOQT. During our ownership, we turned KBFW into a 24 hour station and kept the country format till we sold it. We sold it to the chain SAGA, they basically bought all commercial stations in town, in 1998. The station is now running liberal talk and play by play sports. I hope these memories and stories are of interest to others. If anyone has specific trivia questions about KOQT, KENY, KBFW, KPUG, or Bellingham radio in general, I may have the contacts or memories to answer those inquiries.

Steven L. Smith
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Re: Proposed towers get static on both sides of the border

Postby radiofan » Sun May 29, 2016 10:20 pm

Very informative post Steven. Great stuff!

I visited the old KOQT studios a few times when the station returned to the air in 1970, I recall a room full of records, mostly in boxes and in piles on the floor, not filed on shelves like you'd expect at a radio station.
Somewhere I have a letterhead with the Sate street address.

Over the years, I'm sure I visited every location KBFW in Downtown Bellingham as well as out at the SRO Drive In theatre at the south end of town.

In all my years of collecting Music Surveys from stations, I never did get one from KENY! In 1966 or 1967 I stopped by the studio which was very near Sears in Downtown (on a Sunday) and the place was closed up tight, and of course there was some surveys on the front counter (behind locked doors!).

Let me know if you ever run across one somewhere in your boxes of KENY/KBFW files.

Also, would you happen to have any old reel to reel tapes of KPUG, KBFW or KENY jingles??

Thank you for sharing your history of Bellingham radio with us!
Those who danced were thought to be quite insane by those who couldn't hear the music.
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Re: Proposed towers get static on both sides of the border

Postby Dan Sys » Mon May 30, 2016 5:19 am

Fascinating historical account Steven. Brings back lots of memories of those weekend trips to Bellingham with my parents in the 60's. They would shop downtown at Newberry's, Bonanza 88, The Bon Marche, etc. and I would visit the radio stations. I can't remember if it was KENY or KOQT, but one of them used to be located on the top floor of the old Bellingham Hotel. A few hikes were made up to Sunset Drive to visit KPUG and hang out with the weekend DJ. Always had a burger at Herfy's too at the end of the day.
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Re: Proposed towers get static on both sides of the border

Postby jon » Mon May 30, 2016 8:01 am

I remember KOQT when they were on the air, of course, but my favourite memories were when they were off the air. I am almost certain that, during some of that period of time, KGAR-1550 in Vancouver, Washington, was also off the air for months at a time.

The result was to make 1550 a rather interesting daytime DX frequency. KKHI in San Francisco was one of the few all-classical music stations on AM at the time. Not that I was a fan of the music at the time, but they were dominant enough on the frequency that I could see fans listening, and it was certainly a novelty for me at the time.

As mentioned earlier though, the big highlight was hearing, pretty much every day in the winter, KRGO from Salt Lake City. I could also hear KSL-1160, but KRGO was a 10,000 watt daytimer, making them my most distant "best" reception at High Noon in the 1960s. Aim the loop antenna South and get KKHI, aim it South West and get KRGO, and both clear with no interference.
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Re: Proposed towers get static on both sides of the border

Postby radiofan » Mon May 30, 2016 8:07 am

Dan Sys wrote:Fascinating historical account Steven. Brings back lots of memories of those weekend trips to Bellingham with my parents in the 60's. They would shop downtown at Newberry's, Bonanza 88, The Bon Marche, etc. and I would visit the radio stations. I can't remember if it was KENY or KOQT, but one of them used to be located on the top floor of the old Bellingham Hotel. A few hikes were made up to Sunset Drive to visit KPUG and hang out with the weekend DJ. Always had a burger at Herfy's too at the end of the day.



Sounds like we had similar weekend trips to "The Ham" back in the 60's! You forgot to mention Pay 'N Save Drugs downtown, that was always a stop to check out new 45's. Next door to P 'N S was The International Cafe which always had the daily KGMI top news stories sheets on every table (I may still have a few of those packed away somewhere. I believe it was actually KBFW that was in the Bellingham Hotel (about 1970) before they made the move out to the SRO Drive In.

SRO put together a great group of stations in Washington, Oregon and California that included KBFW, KZOK and KUUU (later KSND and KJET) in Seattle, KALE and KIOK in The Tri Cities, KEDO and KLYK in Longview, KASH 1600 in Eugene and legendary KSJO in San Jose.

Ahhh yes, Herfy's Burgers...
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Re: Proposed towers get static on both sides of the border

Postby StevenSmith » Mon May 30, 2016 10:21 pm

I will respond to a number of the comments that were posted since my post yesterday.

As for KOQT, 1970, being a mess that is true. It was very disorganized in the early days of getting back on the air. When I got there in June it was still a mess. Les Cole found out that my father was a carpenter and he wanted some semblance of order. My dad made large album racks for KOQT that were in the production room off the control room. There really never was much of a production room other than a mic, a cheapo board with a couple slider pots, from a local music store, and one old turntable. As I recall, we had to record directly on cart....no reel to real so no splicing or anything fancy. I learned that at KBFW.'

The State street office of KOQT was short lived. The idea was to make it seem a sophisticated place, but things never really took off for them. Sales were poor, I think the reason Chet Mathieson left in fairly short order. The downtown studio vs. the trailer studio in north Bellingham, was right under the YMCA, although I may not be able to pick the exact spot.

I had left out the moves made by KBFW. When the station went off the air around 1967, the studio was across from the Sears building on Cornwall Ave. In the same complex was Skagit-Whatcom Electronics where I bought parts as a kid for my bedroom station. This hole in the wall office, if you looked, actually had old cardboard egg cartons glued to the control room wall as soundproofing....no, not something that looked like egg cartsons, it was the bottom "egg holding" side of egg cartons.

Fred Danz of SRO had the money to run a station and he wanted something classy. And shortly after going back on the air, he moved the station to the top floor of the Bellingham Towers or Bellingham Hotel. That was a great studio, I worked there for a month or two, and we could see police chases, everything going on. We got the temperature with binoculars reading a lighted thermometer at a bank on Cornwall Ave. Fred build the Samish Drive-In theater and built the top floor as the radio studio. I helped chief engineer, Bill Hamelin, move KBFW from the tower to the Samish. First we moved the production board and some extra cart machines. We got it hooked up and working. As we did that, we stayed live at the main studio in the tower. We had the phone company run another equalized phone line from the new studio to the transmitter....at King Mountain at the end of James Street Road past K-Mart. That night, I stayed in the studio, Bill went out and switched over the new phone line to the audio processing gear at the transmitter. Then, at midnight when we could legally experiment or do a proof of performance or whatever, we went back on the air and made sure it was all working. So for a couple weeks to a month, until the main control room was moved, we broadcast from the production board during the day, cut the ads at night in that same room. On the air staff, at the time, was Lan Rogers (later Lee Rogers in Seattle, Portland and all over), Jay Hamilton (worked at KMPS), Bill Taylor, David James and me, Steve Lewis. After buying the station, we stayed at the Samish for a number of years. But we moved over to the corner of Meridian and Broadway about 1992. My business partner was Ted DeWitt, of Dewitt's Furniture store, and we were in office space above his building. That space is now occupied, top and bottom, by the Re-Store. The Samish was the most fun....they had a couch where we could sit and watch movies, with our own audio speaker. Sometimes you might walk in on another jock with a girl on the couch, that could be embarrassing. Before the move and at intermissions, they played tapes made by KBFW jocks. We got cheap pizzas and hotdogs. That space is now the parking lot for WWU, but if you look at the blacktop, you can still see the bumps or high spots where the speaker posts were.

I cannot help with any KENY music surveys. Other than official FCC docs and engineering, I have nothing as far as trivia on KENY.....except for stories by friends who were there. And several documents reference Tom Haveman. In all the years, like 27, that I was at KBFW, I don't think we ever did a printed music survey. At one point we gave one to a local newspaper and they printed it. And I do not recall ever doing a countdown show other than, when I owned it, we ran the nationally syndicated American Country Countdown with Bob Kingsley.

I do have some jingles and old air checks from KPUG and KBFW. I know I have at least two or three different eras of jingles from KPUG and, probably, some from the station I owned....KBFW. I have boxes of old tapes and some of the best stuff is reel to reel, so I would have to transfer that and will try to do so. If I dig out such materials that might be of interest, who would I send them to post here at this site? The early KOQT, of Joe Tyrrell, probably had jingles, but the operation I worked at in the 1970's did not have the money or the wherewithal to buy or produce jingles.

I would have inserted a couple old and topic appropriate photos here, but I clicked on image above but could not figure out just how to do put in a photo from my computer. Any explanation of how to do so would be helpful, send by private email if you wish. kingofthehouse@comcast.net

Also, is anyone here old enough to remember the night, in 1962, when KPUG's Mike Forne created a national news story by locking himself in the control room and playing only Telstar by the Tornadoes during his late night shift. I managed to come into possession of a recording of that 50 year old broadcast, also, I got the real story as to what really happened that night from a witness, and I have a number of photos of Forne at KPUG in that time-frame. Fun stuff.
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