Broadcast History - November 12

Broadcast History - November 12

Postby jon » Sat Nov 11, 2017 8:44 pm

In 1954, Red Robinson became the first DJ in Canada to play Rock & Roll full-time. He did his first air shift and worked full-time on CJOR Vancouver while still a high school student, after tricking Al Jordan on-air with a fake telephone interview with a famous Hollywood actor. On November 8, 2000, Red Robinson retired from daily broadcasting, after doing his last weekday morning show on CISL Vancouver. One little known, but verified, fact has recently surfaced: Red had actually been hired by KJR Seattle in the summer of 1960, gave his notice at KGW Portland, but before he had worked through his notice period, he was drafted, and never was able to show up for work at KJR. Instead, he reported for duty, but was able to continue on-air on weekends at KMBY Monterey, the future home of both Robert W. Morgan and Robert O. Smith. In Canada, Red is best known as Program Director of CFUN, where he was hired after Dave McCormick departed for K-MAKe Fresno, to work with Ron Jacobs. Together with Bill Drake, at KYNO Fresno, they would create Much More Music, Boss Radio, known in the industry as The Drake Format.

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In 1960, CJAY-TV Winnipeg signed on to Channel 7 at 5:30 p.m. as Winnipeg's first privately owned television station. The station was owned by Lloyd Moffat, but did not become CKY-TV, to match CKY-AM, until 1973. Lloyd had specifically requested the CKY call letters in the late 1940s, after the call letters were lost a couple of years earlier with the sale of CKY by Manitoba Government Telephones to the CBC, becoming CBW. We have racked our brains, but cannot think of any other Canadian stations with only three call letters besides CKY, CKX Brandon, the former CKO stations, and those owned by the CBC.
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