Broadcast History - July 13

Broadcast History - July 13

Postby jon » Wed Jul 12, 2017 9:45 pm

In 1972, Gordon Sinclair Jr. ("Gord") received CRTC approval to sell CFOX Montreal (Pointe Claire) to Allan Slaight, who immediately (July 24th) switched format to Country, to match Slaight's CFGM Toronto (Richmond Hill). Prior to that, CFOX under Sinclair's management was one of Canada's best Top 40 stations ever. DJ Charles P. Rodney Chandler broadcast his daily show from John & Yoko's hotel room, and can be heard playing coffee table on "Give Peace a Chance", which was recorded there. Chuck spent most of his career in Edmonton. The late Gord Robson, also from CFOX, was CHQT's PM Drive and Music Director until the end of the Cool 8-80 period; Capital-FM's AM Drive host Rob Christie is also back in Edmonton, but got his start doing all nights at CFOX in 1970. And the late John Sykes moved from CFOX to CKVN (CFUN) just after they went "All News" in the summer of 1969. Marc Denis has started an excellent CFOX tribute site at http://www.marcdenis.com/cfox.

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The son of Gordon Sinclair, Sr., Gord co-founded CFOX-1470 on March 15, 1960 with 1000 watts. He passed away on July 12, 2002. Allan Slaight sold CFOX in 1977 and it became All News CKO, abandoning the CFOX call letters, picked up by CKLG-FM Vancouver on January 6, 1979. The 1470 frequency went forever silent in 1989, and the license was revoked in 1990.

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Also in 1972, the federal government finally clarified the ownership of broadcast licenses by provincial governments, allowing them to be held by an independent corporation not directly controlled by a provincial government, so long as the station met a strict definition of "educational programming". In 1948, Federal Minister C.D. Howe stated that no province could own a radio station. Quebec's radio plans were scrapped, Manitoba Government Telephones sold its radio stations, but CKUA Edmonton was somehow ignored. In 1970, the federal government suddenly issued a directive to the CRTC demanding adherence to that 22 year old statement, expanding it to television. In the years that followed, several provinces began educational television services. For example, the Alberta government created a new Crown Corporation in 1973, the Alberta Education Communications Corporation, which, in turn, created a subsidiary, ACCESS Alberta, to which the licenses of CKUA AM & FM could be transferred from the University of Alberta. ACCESS also gained control of the government's educational radio and television production operations, and would later expand CKUA to 16 FM transmitters across the province and create ACCESS TV accessible by cable and satellite across the province, with terrestrial transmitters in Calgary and Edmonton. The CKUA broadcast licenses were actually transferred on March 31, 1974.

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