Broadcast History - May 16

Broadcast History - May 16

Postby jon » Tue May 15, 2018 8:52 pm

In 1932, The Canadian Radio Broadcasting Act was passed by Parliament, subjecting private stations to the control of the Canadian Radio Broadcasting Commission (CRBC).

In 1968, CFCN-TV Lethbridge was licensed on Channel 13 with 36,700 watts video and 7340 watts audio, with a directional signal from a 582 foot antenna, sharing a tower and studio space with CJLH-TV. The station was to be a part-time rebroadcaster of CFCN-TV Calgary, receiving the programming over the air.

Also in 1968, CJOY-1460 Guelph (Ontario) was approved for an FM on 106.1 MHz with 50,000 watts. Beginning as CJOY-FM, the station is currently CIMJ-FM. Both stations are now owned by Corus.

In 1974, CJAT Trail was authorized to simulcast the all-night show of CKEK Cranbrook (and CFEK Fernie). CKEK had purchased CJAT AM & FM on July 24, 1972, later selling the FM to the CBC.

In 1978, CKOC Hamilton (Ontario) was authorized to increase power from 10,000 to 50,000 watts. But a move in transmitter site was also required because of increasing residential development around the existing tower site, nine miles South of Hamilton. The new site is 18 miles South of Hamilton.

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In 1990, CHLW-1 Grand Centre (Alberta) was authorized to provide 20 hours per week of local programming, rather than simply rebroadcasting CHLW St. Paul, as it had since signing on in 1979.

In 2001, Vancouver's CHAN-TV announced that News anchor Bill Good would be leaving to host supper hour news on rival CIVT-TV beginning September 1st. Pamela Martin soon joined.

In 2004, Harry Elton died of a sudden heart attack. Born in Detroit in 1930, he is best known for his work in Britain, where he worked at Granada Television with creator Tony Warren to develop Coronation Street, which debuted December 9th, 1960. Returning to Canada in 1963, the remainder of his career was at CBC Radio and Television, other than an early stint as News Anchor at CJOH-TV Ottawa. He managed CBC TV in Calgary from 1976-79. His last year before retirement in 1989 was spent at the Museum of Civilization, where he was seconded under an executive interchange program. After retirement, he visited China and became fascinated with the country. He was in Tibet when he died, celebrating the 50th anniversary of the Canada-China Friendship Society. Harry's CCF bio can be found at http://www.broadcasting-history.ca/pers ... lton-harry

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