I was a broadcast journalist. Now, TV is the last place I go

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I was a broadcast journalist. Now, TV is the last place I go

Postby radiofan » Sat Mar 02, 2024 10:31 pm

OPINION
I was a broadcast journalist. Now, TV is the last place I go for news
WENDY MESLEY

CONTRIBUTED TO THE GLOBE AND MAIL
PUBLISHED MARCH 2


Wendy Mesley is a journalist, podcaster and blogger.

I’m a former anchor of the CBC News program The National and I have an uncomfortable confession to make: I don’t watch the news.

This is really hard to say but I don’t watch The National any more. I can’t tell you the last time I watched W5. I don’t get news from people who do what I used to do for a living. It’s sad, but it’s much more than that.

I’ve been sitting on the sidelines as I watch people react to all the job cuts, amid our shrinking media landscape. It hurts to see people I know and love lose their jobs. There is lots of anger and disappointment over the latest layoffs at Bell. I get it: W5 is the longest-running investigative program in Canada. CBC could be next, if Pierre Poilievre becomes prime minister and defunds it.

But here’s the awkward part: If everyone who is complaining about the cuts actually watched, the situation would be very different.

It breaks my heart to say this, but I understand why people don’t watch the legacy stations any more. If I’m being honest, the stories, tone and presentation are just not working. I have lots of other options, and they’re better. By 10 or 11 at night, I have all the information I need. We’re not going back to the 1960s – or the 1990s, for that matter.

It’s disappointing and scary, and it’s beyond sad. That said, it’s happening. So what are we going to do about it?

A lot of people have been calling out Bell, or other corporate bosses. I’m happy to join the chorus. That’s easy. It’s true they have an onus to provide quality news, and it’s their responsibility in return for being given access to the airwaves. They should be made to hold up their end of the bargain. Everyone was happy when the media was making a lot of money, when people were watching.

It’s also true that technology has changed things. And it’s true that advertisers go where the eyeballs are. Advertising money kept traditional media alive for decades. Now the audience has splintered and gone elsewhere, and the ad money has followed. All this is true, but it’s a lot more than that.

The current model is not working. I don’t have a magic solution, but it seems there are a few basic considerations. How do we chase an audience? Can a large newsroom or network connect with a large Canadian audience? Can it face controversy and offer two sides on difficult discussions? And if it can, who will pay for it?

I left CBC in 2021 and am now doing a podcast and writing a blog on Substack with another well-known media personality, Maureen Holloway. I’m having the time of my life, talking to interesting people, talking and writing unfettered. That said, it’s difficult to make a living without the reach and scale of a network. If this is the future of journalism, it’s hard to imagine what it must be like for the twentysomethings. It’s not easy, but I’m still desperate to know what’s happening in the world.

Read the full story at: https://www.theglobeandmail.com/opinion ... -for-news/
Those who danced were thought to be quite insane by those who couldn't hear the music.
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Re: I was a broadcast journalist. Now, TV is the last place

Postby Just sayin' » Sun Mar 03, 2024 10:59 am

Wendy nails it. No one's interested in the drivel being offered up, especially local. Cute dog stories, chasing fire engines, usual and trivial 'crime' stories, interspersed with inane convos among the presenters, just doesn't cut it. As she correctly points out, I've got other sources at my fingertips for the latest News, unfettered and without the gibberish. The model is broken. Bell execs know it's broken and are dismantling it in stages. What and where we get our News in the future won't be the same but one thing is for sure: it can't be any worse.
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Re: I was a broadcast journalist. Now, TV is the last place

Postby tuned » Sun Mar 03, 2024 1:45 pm

She's another far left propagandist. Her new "news" souces are far left establishment rags like the NYT and the Guardian. She's soaked up enough money from Canadian taxpayers. Just go the away.
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Re: I was a broadcast journalist. Now, TV is the last place

Postby the-real-deal » Sun Mar 03, 2024 9:05 pm

tuned wrote:She's another far left propagandist. Her new "news" souces are far left establishment rags like the NYT and the Guardian. She's soaked up enough money from Canadian taxpayers. Just go the away.


I did enjoy watching Ms. Mesley, and her Sunday night news shows. At least she was human ? She was also suspended, twice, from CBC, for using the "n" word and then, another faux pas that I can't remember. At least she kept her job and didn't get fired?

The political bias, political correctness, and also, extremes among today's news media (as in "left" or "right") is so gawd damned awful and lacking in objectivity, you have to hold your nose and read/watch some of that sh*t.

Or, like many, not read/watch it at all ! CTV News is still the "arse kisser" when it comes to the Conservative Party of Canada, for example. You can count the news anchors at CTV going back to Lloyd Robertson, Harvey Kirk, and Bruce Phillips, and how they were mostly schills for the Progressive Conservative Party (and their later versions). Just disgusting.

I personally stopped reading and watching cbcnews.ca, though, because it stunk of a left-winged speedball mixed with man hating feminism, the exaltation of First Nations propaganda and victimization, and visible minorities getting hired as CBC journalists, not because they were any good, but merely because they were female, brown, yellow, or Indian, etc.

As one of Canada's first Asians to actually work in radio news, I have no qualms about ambitious minorities who climbed up the broadcast ladder, after me ?

However, today's CBC hiring model is about as silly as Service Canada hiring these heavily accented Asians to answer their phones about government business.

NOW, I'M ASIAN, (my parents were born in Colombo, Sri Lanka and were also pioneers of immigration in the Province of Quebec). Yet, I cannot understand what the f*ck these call center reps are saying to me ! In many cases, I have to escalate my call to their white supervisor and only then can I understand what was fully said. It belies the whole idea of multiculturalism, though, when immigrants cannot speak and write clear and concise English.

Regarding the decline of Canadian journalism, overall, now that is a much more complex subject and the reasons therein. However, to blame the CBC or Ms. Mesley seems rather absurd?

Having worked in many newsrooms over the years, journalism is not only a tough gig, but it also requires buckets of cash, which most media outlets typically don't have (or so they claim?) or in many cases, they are either a) LAZY and or b) simply CHEAP ! Maybe the beancounters who manage these media outlets don't want journalism to exist ? They don't like us (journalists).
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Re: I was a broadcast journalist. Now, TV is the last place

Postby Peteradio » Tue Mar 05, 2024 5:35 pm

Weeping for Wendy. Not.
Anyone who devours the NYT should be dismissed right away.
Nice shot at Poilieure. Typical lefty.

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