CRTC denies Sun Basic cable

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CRTC denies Sun Basic cable

Postby former tv guy » Thu Aug 08, 2013 7:20 am

From Canadian Press

The CRTC has rejected a bid by Sun News Network to be carried on basic cable.

The Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission says the upstart network which has warned its future would depend on the decision does not meet the criteria for a mandatory distribution order.

The CRTC says the bar is set very high for such an order.

Sun News Network went on the air in April 2011.

Three months ago, Sun News executives told the commission that anything short of mandatory carriage would spell the end of the channel.

Last year, it lost $17 million, a situation parent company Quebecor calls clearly unsustainable.
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Re: CRTC denies Sun Basic cable

Postby jon » Thu Aug 08, 2013 7:36 am

CRTC proposes a new approach to national news services
Canada NewsWire

OTTAWA and GATINEAU, QC, Aug. 8, 2013 /CNW/ - Today, the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) invited Canadians to participate in a review of its policy on the licensing of Canadian national news television services. It also invited comments on the distribution conditions for these services and for foreign news services.

"The diversity of voices is an essential component of our society, particularly as they relate to news and information in the Canadian broadcasting system" said Jean-Pierre Blais, Chairman of the CRTC. "Television news channels provide an important public service by ensuring that Canadians are exposed to different opinions and perspectives on matters that concern all citizens. We are concerned that, under the existing rules, Canadian news services are not being given a pride of place in our broadcasting system."

During the CRTC's public hearing that began on April 23, 2013, Canadians presented evidence suggesting that the policy on specialty Canadian national news services should be reviewed. The CRTC will focus specifically on the challenges that face new players in this sector, particularly in terms of their distribution. These challenges are not unique to any given service, but rather an indication of a wider and more systemic issue regarding the distribution of Canadian national news services under equitable and commercially reasonable conditions.

The CRTC invites Canadians to comment on a proposed regulatory framework that includes the following:

distributors must offer all Canadian national news services (not necessarily on basic service)
distributors must place Canadian news services in close proximity in their channel lineup
national news services must be available in a package and on a stand-alone basis
national news services should be offered in the most appropriate packages according to their content.
Those who wish to participate in the CRTC's proceeding are invited to submit their comments by September 9, 2013. Comments may be submitted by completing the online form, by writing to the Secretary General, CRTC, Ottawa, Ontario, K1A 0N2, or by fax at 819-994-0218.

About Canadian television news services

Despite the significant technological changes currently underway, Canadians still overwhelmingly access news affecting their country and their community through the Canadian broadcasting system. Nearly 12 million households subscribe to a cable or satellite television service. Canadians collectively watched more than 138 million hours of news programming in 2011-2012, 45% of which was on specialty news services.

Currently, non-Canadian news services are, for the most part, distributed in popular packages and have significant access to Canadian viewers. On average, non-Canadian news services receive wholesale fees from cable and satellite companies of $0.73 per subscriber per month, while Canadian news services receive monthly wholesale fees of $0.36 per subscriber, which are half the fees paid to non-Canadian services.

Broadcasting Notice of Consultation CRTC 2013-394
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Re: CRTC denies Sun Basic cable

Postby jon » Thu Aug 08, 2013 7:39 am

CRTC grants mandatory distribution to three new television services
Canada NewsWire

OTTAWA and GATINEAU, QC, Aug. 8, 2013

Canadians living with a visual impairment, francophones and citizens of the North will be better served by the Canadian broadcasting system

OTTAWA and GATINEAU, QC, Aug. 8, 2013 /CNW/ - Today, the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) approved a limited number of applications for mandatory distribution on cable and satellite companies' digital basic television service.

"Canadians across the country will have access to programming that meets a real and exceptional need, and that would not be widely available without our intervention," said Jean-Pierre Blais, Chairman of the CRTC. "We are making sure, however, that television services remain affordable for Canadians by imposing reasonable rates for services offered on the basic service."

The CRTC examined 22 applications for mandatory distribution orders from services that already had such an order and wished to renew it, from existing services seeking to obtain a first distribution order and from new services.

After an in-depth examination of these applications, the CRTC approved two new services for mandatory distribution on the basic service of all distributors in the country, and one service for mandatory distribution on the basic service of satellite companies in Nunavut and the Northwest Territories. The CRTC also granted a new distribution order on a discretionary basis. Lastly, the CRTC renewed five existing mandatory distribution orders.

New services that meet a real and exceptional need

As a result of the mandatory distribution on basic of the new service AMI TV in French, Francophone Canadians living with a visual impairment will have access to programming in their language that is particularly relevant to their needs. This service offers audiovisual content specifically adapted to the needs of people who are blind or partially sighted. A similar English-language service has been offered since 2009.

French-language minority communities will also be better reflected on television and have access to two additional French-language services. Nouveau TV5 will be distributed on a mandatory basis on the basic service across the country. It will offer programming devoted to diversity within the Canadian francophone community and official language minority communities.

The CRTC also granted a distribution order to ensure that ARTV is carried by all distributors. However, Canadians can choose whether to subscribe to this service.

These two orders are positive measures to foster the development of official language minority communities.

Citizens of the North will have better access to legislative debates as the service operated by the Legislative Assemblies of Nunavut and the Northwest Territories will be added to the basic service of satellite television subscribers in those two territories.

Renewal of existing distribution orders

Canadians living with visual disabilities will continue to have access to AMI-TV in English, AMI Audio and Canal M, as the CRTC renewed their mandatory distribution orders on the basic service of all distributors in the country.

The CRTC also renewed the mandatory distribution order for the Aboriginal Peoples Television Network (APTN). This is the only service in the country to exclusively offer content by and for Aboriginal peoples. As such, it contributes in an exceptional manner to Canadian expression and reflects attitudes, opinions, ideas, values and artistic creativity that would otherwise not be seen on television.

Finally, Canadians will continue to have access to the parliamentary debates and public affairs programming provided by Cable Public Affairs Channel (CPAC), as the CRTC renewed its mandatory distribution on the basic service of all distributors.

These orders are valid for five years.

Affordability of the basic service

The CRTC considered the need of consumers to have access to affordable television services. Each application was examined in order to ensure reasonable rates that will allow services to fulfill their mandate, without unduly increasing television subscribers' bills. In doing so, the CRTC has imposed lower rates than were requested by four services: AMI TV in French, Canal M, APTN and Nouveau TV5. All the successful applications are operated by not-for-profit organizations.

Other applications

Given its exceptional nature, the CRTC has set the bar very high for obtaining a mandatory distribution order. The CRTC's policy requires that a service seeking such an order must clearly demonstrate its exceptional nature and that it achieves important public policy objectives under the Broadcasting Act.

The applications from the following services were denied, not having successfully demonstrated to the CRTC that they met the criteria for a mandatory distribution order:

Accents
All Points Bulletin
Canadian Punjabi Network
Described Video Guide
Dolobox TV
EqualiTV
Fusion
Maximum Television Canada
Starlight: The Canadian Movie Channel
Sun News Network
La télévision des ressources naturelles
Vision TV
In addition, the mandatory distribution order on the basic service in French-language markets granted to Avis de recherche will expire in two years.

The CRTC today also issued a notice of consultation inviting comments from Canadians on a new approach regarding national news television services.

Today's decision follows a proceeding that included a public hearing held from April 23 to May 2, 2013. The Commission received and considered over 135,000 interventions from Canadians regarding these applications.

Broadcasting Regulatory Policy CRTC 2013-372
Broadcasting Notice of Consultation CRTC 2013-394
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Re: CRTC denies Sun Basic cable

Postby Mike Cleaver » Thu Aug 08, 2013 12:25 pm

So, shut'er down already!
No one watches it anyway.
Mandatory carry rules should be scrapped.
Cable and satellite should be a la carte, pay only for the channels you watch.
Which means many more would go down the tubes (pun intended.)
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Engineering, News, Voice work and Consulting
Vancouver, BC, Canada

54 years experience at some of Canada's Premier Broadcasting Stations
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Re: CRTC denies Sun Basic cable

Postby SKradiophile » Thu Aug 08, 2013 1:41 pm

Future programming will include an ongoing pledge drive to help Charles Adler stay on the air! :lol:
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