Broadcast History - February 6

Broadcast History - February 6

Postby radiofan » Mon Feb 05, 2018 9:56 pm

In 1908, Marconi provided the first commercial Trans-Atlantic wireless service. We are talking Morse code here. It would be 1919 before Marconi provided the first Trans-Atlantic voice service. That was the same year that Marconi's radio station, XWA Montreal, was licensed. XWA became CFCF.

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In 1961, CFFB Frobisher Bay signed on to 1200 KHz, the clearest of the 1-A Clear Channels, with WOAI San Antonio, Texas, the only other station on the frequency at night at that time in North America. WOAI was Clear Channel's first acquisition, and inspired the company name. As for CFFB, sources disagree on how much power the station had for the ten and a half years it was on 1200. But it was always the dream of most DX'ers to hear CFFB when WOAI was off for transmitter maintenance after midnight on Sunday nights. In 1987, Frobisher Bay was renamed Iqaluit. And in 1999, the portion of the Northwest Territories that includes Iqaluit became Nunavut.

In 1984, the CBC Stereo network began broadcasting 24 hours a day, at a time when the AM network signed off after the 1:00 a.m. ("1:30 in Newfoundland") News. The AM network had dropped all night broadcasting in the late 1960s, and did not resume 24 hour broadcasting until the Gulf War at the beginning of the 1990s.

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In 1991, CITV-TV Edmonton and CKRD-TV Red Deer were approved by the CRTC for sale from Dr. Allard's Allarcom to Westcom, owned by WIC. Allarcom had purchased CKRD-TV in 1989, from Monarch. Under the terms of the 1991 sale, Dr. Allard became a Director of WIC, Chairman of the Divisional Boards of the Alberta television stations, and controlled 22.4% of the non-voting Class B shares of WIC. Dr. Allard died that same year.

In 1995, Saskatoon saw a call letter swap. At 6:00 a.m. CFQC-AM became CJWW, still on 600 KHz, but with a Traditional Country format. At 7:00 a.m., CJWW-AM left 750 KHz for 92.9 MHz with 100,000 watts as CFQC-FM, with a Modern Country format. CJWW had purchased the bankrupt CFQC the year before.

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In 2003, CJSF-FM Burnaby began testing, with official launch at 7:00 p.m. on Valentines Day. On 90.1 MHz with 450 watts -- lots of power when you are broadcasting from the top of Burnaby Mountain. The Simon Fraser University campus station began as CKSF in 1966, thanks in large part to the work of students Brian Antonson, later of BCIT's broadcast program, John Bishop and Rob Turner. Studios were in a janitor's closet, but SFU's concrete construction made windowless Room TC315 look more like a fallout shelter. When I did my first air shift at CKSF on Hallowe'en 1969, it was the first time I'd worked with professional equipment. The station broadcast on 650 KHz via carrier current to Shell House, one of the student residences, and via closed circuit (speakers) everywhere else. Including, I was told, underwater at the swimming pool. Not sure that I ever believed that.
Those who danced were thought to be quite insane by those who couldn't hear the music.
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