Broadcast History - June 21

Broadcast History - June 21

Postby jon » Wed Jun 20, 2018 8:03 pm

In 1900, Ted (Edward Samuel) Rogers Sr. was born. He accomplished a tremendous amount in a short life, passing away May 6, 1939, shortly before his son's sixth birthday. Ted Jr. (pictured below) lived nearly twice as long as his father, and was well known today as the outspoken head of Rogers Communications, which included/es subsidiaries Rogers Wireless, Rogers Cable and Telecom, and Rogers Media, owner of radio, television and publishing.

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Ted Sr. was only 11 when he became one of the first licensed radio amateurs in Canada, with a 500 watt spark-gap transmitter. By age 14, he had built a receiver sensitive enough to receive radio signals from Germany, announcing the declaration of war in 1914. By 1920, his own signals could be heard from coast to coast. And, in an American Radio Relay League competition on December 9, 1921, he became the first Canadian amateur radio operator to transmit a signal across the Atlantic.

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In 1925, Ted Sr. invented the world's first Alternating Current (AC) radio -- just plug it into any household wall power outlet. Previous radios required batteries. Commercial production of the tubes for that radio began August 26, 1925, and the Rogers Batteryless radio receiver was on display a few days later at the Canadian National Exhibition in Toronto. Canada's First Rogers Batteryless (CFRB) began broadcasting on February 10, 1927, as the world's first all electric radio station, running directly off utility-provided AC power; other stations ran on low-voltage batteries and DC (Direct Current) generators mechanically coupled to electric AC motors.

In 1931, Ted Sr. (pictured below) was granted Canada's first television license, and foresaw the coming of colour television. He later started Canada's first FM station, simulcasting CFRB-AM on the original 42 MHz FM band with 50 watts. And he did significant work on Radar before his death just before World War II.

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On this day in 1971, to celebrate what would have been the 71st birthday of the late Ted Rogers, Sr., CHFI-AM Toronto changed call letters to CFTR, the TR for "Ted Rogers". CFTR ceased simulcasting CHFI-FM the next year, and later became one of Canada's great Top 40 stations, before switching to All News at 6:00 a.m. on June 7, 1993.

In 1985 at 10 a.m., CILK-FM ("Silk") signed on for the first time with a Soft Adult Contemporary ("Smooth as Silk") format on 101.5 MHz with 11,000 watts. The transmitter was located 3200 feet up Okanagan Mountain, 7 km South of Kelowna, with a North-directed pattern. Founded by long-time Okanagan announcer Nick Frost, CILK was one of the few remaining independently-owned stations in Canada when it was sold to Standard Broadcasting for $9,250,000 on December 20, 2006.

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In 1996, the CRTC approved the sale of CFCN-TV Calgary to CTV. Then-current owner Rogers had purchased the station from Maclean-Hunter 18 months earlier. CFCN-TV first signed on September 9, 1960.

In 2001 at noon, CKXM-FM Victoria changed formats from country to modern rock as "The Zone @ 91.3 FM", changing call letters to CJZN a few weeks later, on July 5th. The station began in 1950 as CKDA-AM on 1340 with 250 watts, with the "DA" the initials of founder David M. Armstrong.

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Listen to the launch of The Zone @ 91.3 in the Jingle / ID of the day section of Radio West Click Here
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